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          Kick Ash Film Festival Submissions

          Opens January 2nd for film entries. Videos created should be 30 to 60 seconds long. Open to all 7-12th graders in Salt Lake County. Submissions close February 27, 2020.

          Dear Health, Science, or Film/Media Teacher:

          E-cigarette use (“vaping” or “juuling”) among Salt Lake County youth has increased 500% in the last eight years—a statistic we need to change.

          Because we know youth respond better to messages from their peers, the Salt Lake County Health Department is again hosting the Kick Ash Film Festival where Salt Lake County youth in grades 7–12 can win cash and prizes for creating a 30-to-60-second original short film.

          This year’s theme, as determined by the teens in Salt Lake County’s Healthy Teen advisory group, is Huff, Puff, Hooked. Submitted shorts should focus on the dangers of vaping/e-cigarette use or the negative influences driving youth e-cigarette use. Film submissions will be accepted from January 2–February 27, 2020, but we encourage youth to get started now.

          We have included two festival posters and ask you to please display them in appropriate areas of your school or classroom. We also encourage you to consider including this opportunity as an extra-credit assignment or incorporating it into your curriculum or an upcoming lesson.

          Festival Details:

          More information is available at . Thank you for helping youth make a positive difference in the fight against underage tobacco.

          Julia Glade
          Health Educator 

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